Answer These 10 Questions To See If You’re On Track To Retirement


By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

The good news: The Employee Benefit Research Institute’s 2015 Retirement Confidence Survey says workers and retirees are more confident about affording retirement. The bad news: The  survey also says there’s little sign they’re doing enough to achieve that goal. To see whether you’re taking the necessary steps for a secure retirement, answer the 10 questions below.

1. Have you set a savings target? No, I don’t mean a long-term goal like have a $1 million nest egg by age 65. I mean a short-term target like saving a specific dollar amount or percentage of your salary each year. You’ll be more likely to save if you have  such a goal and you’ll have a better sense of whether you’re making progress toward a secure retirement. Saving 15% of salary—the figure cited in a recent Boston College Center for Retirement Research Study—is a good target. If you can’t manage that, start at 10% and increase your savings level by one percentage point a year, or go to the Will You Have Enough To Retire tool to see how you’ll fare with different rates.

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2. Are you making the most of tax-advantaged savings plans? At the very least, you should be contributing enough to take full advantage of any matching funds your 401(k) or other workplace plan offers. If you’re maxing out your plan at work and have still more money you can save, you may also be able to save in other tax-advantaged plans, like a traditional IRA or Roth IRA. (Morningstar’s IRA calculator can tell you whether you’re eligible and, if so, how much you can contribute.) Able to sock away even more? Consider tax-efficient options like broad index fuds, ETFs and tax-managed within taxable accounts.

3. Have you gauged your risk tolerance? You can’t set an effective retirement investing strategy unless you’ve done a gut check—that is, assessed your true risk tolerance. Otherwise, you run the risk of doing what what many investors do—investing too aggressively when the market’s doing well (and selling in a panic when it drops) and too conservatively after stock prices have plummeted (and missing the big gains when the market inevitably rebounds). You can get a good sense of your true appetite for risk within a few minutes by completing this Risk Tolerance Questionnaire-Asset Allocation tool.

4. Do you have the right stocks-bonds mix? Most investors focus their attention on picking specific investments—the top-performing fund or ETF, a high-flying stock, etc. Big mistake. The real driver of long-term investing success is your asset allocation, or how you divvy up your savings between stocks and bonds. Generally, the younger you are and the more risk you’re willing to handle, the more of your savings you want to devote to stocks. The older you are and the less willing you are to see your savings suffer setbacks during market downturns, the more of your savings you want to stash in bonds. The risk tolerance questionnaire mentioned above will suggest a stocks-bonds mix based on your appetite for risk and time horizon (how long you plan to keep your money invested). You can also get an idea of how you should be allocating your portfolio between stocks and bonds by checking out the Vanguard Target Retirement Fund for someone your age.

5. Do you have the right investments? You can easily get the impression you’re some sort of slacker if you’re not loading up your retirement portfolio with all manner of funds, ETFs and other investments that cover every obscure corner of the financial markets. Nonsense. Diversification is important, but you can go too far. You can “di-worse-ify” and end up with an expensive, unwieldy and unworkable smorgasbord of investments. A better strategy: focus on plain-vanilla index funds and ETFs that give you broad exposure to stocks and bonds at a low cost. That approach always makes sense, but it’s especially important to diversify broadly and hold costs down given the projections for lower-than-normal investment returns in the years ahead.

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6. Have you assessed where you stand? Once you’ve answered the previous questions, it’s important that you establish a baseline—that is, see whether you’ll be on track toward a secure retirement if you continue along the saving and investing path you’ve set. Fortunately, it’s relatively easy to do this sort of evaluation. Just go to a retirement income calculator that uses Monte Carlo analysis to do its projections, enter such information as your age, salary, savings rate, how much you already have tucked away in retirement accounts, your stocks-bonds mix and the percentage of pre-retirement income you’ll need after you retire retirement (70% to 80% is a good starting estimate) and the calculator will estimate the probability that you’ll be able to retire given how much you’re saving and how you’re investing. If you’re already retired, the calculator will give you the probability that Social Security, your savings and any other resources will be able to generate the retirement income you’ll need. Ideally, you want a probability of 80% or higher. But if it comes in lower, you can make adjustments such as saving more, spending less, retiring later, etc. to improve your chances. And, in fact, you should go through this assessment every year or so just to see if you do need to tweak your planning.

7. Have you done any “lifestyle planning”? Finances are important, but planning for retirement isn’t just about the bucks. You also want to take time to think seriously about how you’ll actually live in retirement. Among the questions: Will you stay in your current home, downsize or perhaps even relocate to an area with lower living costs? Do you have enough activities—hobbies, volunteering, perhaps a part-time job—to keep you busy and engaged once you no longer have the nine-to-five routine to provide a framework for most days? Do you have plenty of friends, relatives and former co-workers you can turn to for companionship and support. Research shows that people who have a solid social network tend to be happier in retirement (the same, by the way, is true for retirees who have more frequent sex). Obviously, this is an area where your personal preferences are paramount. But seminars for pre-retirees like the Paths To Creative Retirement workshops at the University of North Carolina at Asheville and tools like Ready-2-Retire can help you better focus on lifestyle issues so can ultimately integrate them into your financial planning.

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8. Have you checked out your Social Security options? Although many retirees may not think of it that way, the inflation-adjusted lifetime payments Social Security provides are one of their biggest financial assets, if not the biggest. Which is why it’s crucial that a good five to 10 years before you retire, you seriously consider when to claim Social Security and, if you’re married, how best to coordinate benefits with your spouse. Advance planning can make a big difference. For each year you delay taking benefits between age 62 and 70, you can boost your monthly payment by roughly 7% to 8%. And by taking advantage of different claiming strategies, married couples may be able to increase their lifetime benefit by several hundred thousand dollars. You’ll find more tips on how to get the most out of Social Security in Boston University economist and Social Security expert Larry Kotlikoff’s new Social Security Q&A column on

9. Do you have a Plan B? Sometimes even the best planning can go awry. Indeed, two-thirds of Americans said their retirement planning has been disrupted by such things as major health bills, spates of unemployment, business setbacks or divorce, according to a a recent TD Ameritrade survey. Which is why it’s crucial that you consider what might go wrong ahead of time, and come up with ways to respond so you can mitigate the damage and recover from setbacks more quickly. Along the same lines, it’s also a good idea to periodically crash-test your retirement plan. Knowing how your nest egg might fare during a severe market downturn and what that mean for your retirement prospects can help prevent you from freaking out during periods of financial stress and better formulate a way to get back on track.

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10. Do You Need Help? If you’re comfortable flying solo with your retirement planning, that’s great. But if you think you could do with some assistance—whether on an ongoing basis or with a specific issue—then it makes sense to seek guidance. The key, though, is finding an adviser who’s competent, honest and willing to provide that advice at a reasonable price. The Department of Labor recently released a proposal designed to better protect investors from advisers’ conflicts of interest. We’ll have to see how that works out. In the meantime, though, you can increase your chances of getting good affordable advice by following these four tips and asking these five questions.  (4/25/15)

Walter Updegrave is the editor of RealDealRetirement.comIf you have a question on retirement or investing that you would like Walter to answer online, send it to him at

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