Is It Really Necessary To Rebalance Your Investment Portfolio?

Balance

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement, @RealDealRetire

Ask Real Deal Retirement

I watch my investments and feel pretty comfortable with the level of risk I’m taking, but I’m unsure whether I need to rebalance my retirement portfolio. I read somewhere that you don’t have to as long as you’re still working and contributing to retirement accounts. What do you think—do I need to rebalance or not?

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Should I Buy An Annuity Even If My Adviser Says It’s A Bad Idea?

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

AnnuityKeyboard

Ask Real Deal Retirement

I have roughly $1 million in retirement savings and plan to retire in few years. I won’t have a company pension, so the idea of devoting maybe a third or so of my savings to an annuity to create guaranteed income that can cover fixed expenses and isn’t dependent on the whims of the market appeals to me. The rest of my savings will remain invested for income and growth. An investment adviser I met with is adamantly opposed to this idea and chided me for even considering it. What do you think of my plan?

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Why You Need To Re-Assess Your Retirement Investing Strategy For The New Year

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

ManWithPortfolios

When it comes to investing their retirement savings, investors have had an easy and lucrative time of it in recent years. Since the beginning of 2009, the year stock market bottomed out in the wake of the financial crisis, stocks have gained an annualized 15%, while bonds returned a more modest yet still respectable 4% or so. But with stock valuations stretched and the Federal Reserve expected to hike short-term interest rates three times over the coming year, experts warn that we could be in for significantly lower returns in the years ahead. More»

The Right Way To Spend Your Savings For A Happier Retirement

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

Mexico Chairs_edited-6

Ask Real Deal Retirement

My husband and I are planning to retire this year and want to enjoy retirement. We do not want to skimp on simple pleasures and die with lots of money in the bank. But we also don’t want to run through our savings too soon. So how do we calculate withdrawals from our nest egg to spend as much as possible of our assets before we shuffle off this mortal coil?

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Want To Improve Your Retirement Prospects? Resolve To Do This In The New Year

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

scrabble-resolutions

By now you’ve been inundated with long lists of “must do” New Year’s resolutions ranging from the general (be a nicer person, lead a healthier lifestyle) to the specific (save more, pay down debt). But before your eyes glaze over and you totally succumb to New Year’s Resolutions Fatigue, I’d like you to consider two simple but important suggestions—the first for people still on the job, the second for retirees—that have the potential to significantly increase your chances of having a successful retirement. More»

To Create A Plan That Can Lead To A Secure Retirement Follow These 3 Steps

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

1-2-3

Ask Real Deal Retirement

My husband and I are in our 30s and have two young children. We want to have a strong plan in place for retirement so we can retire comfortably when we’re older, but we aren’t sure how to invest, how much we should be saving or for that matter how much we can afford to save while still providing for our family. What do we need to do to get started? More»

Think You Know How Much You Need To Save For Retirement? Maybe It’s Time For A Reality Check

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

Nest Eggs

Setting a savings target—say, a goal to accumulate a nest egg of $250,000, $500,000, $1 million or whatever—can be an effective step in preparing for retirement. But it’s not enough. You also need to have a reasonable idea of how much income your nest egg might generate after you retire. Unfortunately, when researchers recently queried just under 600 workers with at least $10,000 in investments as part of a broader survey of American adults for the Wells Fargo/Gallup Investor and Retirement Optimism Index, they found that most of them weren’t very good at putting these two crucial pieces of the retirement-planning puzzle together. More»