How (And Why) Reining In Fees Can Dramatically Boost The Size of Your Retirement Nest Egg

Nest Eggs

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement, @RealDealRetire

Unsure about how much you’re shelling out in fees in your retirement accounts? You’re not alone. A recent TD Ameritrade survey of 1,000 investors found that only 27% knew how much they were paying in their 401(k)s and nearly 60% either didn’t know if their plan levied fees or mistakenly believed they weren’t being charged anything. Of course, given the recent turmoil in the stock market, fees may be the last thing on your mind. But over the long term the amount you pay in expenses can play a big role in determining the eventual size of your nest egg as well as how much income you can draw from it after you retire. Which is why it’s important to understand how too-onerous expenses can undermine your retirement prospects and to do all you can to avoid overpaying. More»

Should I Follow Warren Buffett’s 90% Stocks-10% Bonds Strategy With My Retirement Portfolio?

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

Buffett-ppt

Ask Real Deal Retirement

I’m in my early 50s, have more than $1 million in retirement savings and plan to retire around age 60. I‘ve heard about Warren Buffett’s strategy of keeping 90% of one’s assets in stocks and 10% in bonds and like the idea of investing my savings that way to earn higher returns. I know my accounts would take a hit if stock prices fall, but I believe I could survive a market downturn. Do you think this is a good strategy for retirees and near retirees? More»

How The Mother Of All Investment Tables Can Improve Your Retirement Investing Strategy

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

Callan Periodic Table 2018

We’re all familiar with the caveat that past results are no guarantee of future performance. But while that’s true, understanding how different investments have performed in the past—how volatile they’ve been, the returns they’ve earned in markets good and bad and how they’ve fared relative to one another—is nonetheless crucial to creating a retirement investing strategy that jibes with your tolerance for risk. And when it comes to gleaning investment insights from the past that can improve your prospects for a secure retirement in the future, I can think of few better resources than the Callan Periodic Table of Investment Returns, or what I call The Mother of All Investment Tables. More»

Where Should You Put Your Money If You Think The Market Is Going To Crash?

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

FallingChartwithMan

Ask Real Deal Retirement

Where should I put my money now if I believe the stock market is going to crash?

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3 Risks You May Not Be Focusing On That Can Derail Your Retirement

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

high-voltage

When it comes retirement planning, we naturally tend to focus on the risks we’re most aware of, say, the possibility that this nine-year-old bull market could give way to a ravaging bear and take a big chunk out of our savings or that an unscrupulous or incompetent adviser might talk us into inappropriate or expensive investments. And those are valid concerns. But our retirement plans can also be endangered by risks that aren’t as apparent, which can make them all the more insidious. Here are three risks that may not be top of mind but that you should still guard against as you plan for and enter retirement. More»

3 Things You Need To Know About The 4% Rule

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

4 Percent

Ask Real Deal Retirement

I have questions about the “maximum safe withdrawal rate,” or the 4% rule. If you’re withdrawing the money from an IRA, do you factor in your marginal tax rate to arrive at the 4% withdrawal? And how do you adjust withdrawals in reaction to strong or weak investment results?

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Should I Move My Retirement Savings Out Of The Market?

By Walter Updegrave, RealDealRetirement @RealDealRetire

100 Stocks

Ask Real Deal Retirement

I’m well into retirement age, although still working, and have my nest egg of about $500,000 invested entirely stocks. But I’m getting worried about the future of the economy and the market. Should I transfer everything to a safer investment?

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